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As the bearer of a trade certificate in French Polishing (among other things), it is with much mirth I gaze upon the latest snide captioning from Unhappy Hipsters.



Another Sunday morning spent whisking small batches of artisanal wood stains so they might continue darkening the floor, one six-inch-square at a time.

(Photo: Misha Gravenor; Dwell)

This is being typed sitting at my kitchen table, which might seem a small thing to you, but after 5 days of round and round in circles with my new ISP and the Netgear people, being tethered to a modem by an ethernet cable had lost its allure well and truly. Especially as the person who had TransACT install the cable put the plug in the main bedroom. Not the most convenient place to work; fine for re-runs of QI at 3am when unable to sleep, but not terrbily handy for Being Productive.

But for reasons I cannot begin to fathom, my "fiddling" with something to do with the Netgear protocols via 192.168.1.1 has worked. Of course I can't ever turn either the modem or wireless router off for fear of losing whatever it is that I have done, but this is a small price to pay when the other option is a trailing 10 metre ethernet cable.

And whilst in techy mode, dear Abode, please do not include stripped down bits of McAfee security programs in your Adobe Reader updates. As a thinking human being I am about as likely to want to use any McAfee product as I am to write a character reference for Mr Gaddafi. Avast and AVG work just fine thanks.

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Raw linseed oil is not a furniture or joinery finish

Repeat after me.....

Raw linseed oil is not a furniture or joinery finish
Raw linseed oil is not a furniture or joinery finish
Raw linseed oil is not a furniture or joinery finish

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